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University of Rochester finds that games can improve vision!
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Written by Daniel   
Wednesday, 07 February 2007 09:32
Video Games Improve Vision by 20 Percent
Marcus Yam (Blog) - February 7, 2007 9:34 AM
DailyTech

Students had to quickly identify the orientation of the middle "T" - Action game players could do it better - Image courtesy University of Rochester
Research says playing video games improves your bottom line on a standard eye chart


Video games that contain high levels of action can actually improve your vision, claim researchers at the University of Rochester. Their findings, which will appear in the journal Psychological Science, show that people who played action video games for a few hours a day over the course of a month improved by about 20 percent in their ability to identify letters presented in clutter—a visual acuity test similar to ones used in regular ophthalmology clinics.

“Action video game play changes the way our brains process visual information,” says Daphne Bavelier, professor of brain and cognitive sciences at the University of Rochester. “After just 30 hours, players showed a substantial increase in the spatial resolution of their vision, meaning they could see figures like those on an eye chart more clearly, even when other symbols crowded in.”

Bavelier and graduate student Shawn Green tested college students who had played few, if any, video games in the last year. “That alone was pretty tough,” says Green. “Nearly everybody on a campus plays video games.”

At the outset, the students were given a crowding test, which measured how well they could discern the orientation of a “T” within a crowd of other distracting symbols—a sort of electronic eye chart. Students were then divided into two groups. The experimental group played Unreal Tournament for roughly one hour a day. The control group played Tetris, a game the researchers believe is equally demanding in terms of motor control, but visually less complex than the shooter.... Much More

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